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. senator mikulski was just on the floor and talked about the circumstances in the city of crisfield n. that city. in that city, 32% of the population live blo live below e poverty level. 71% sustained water damage. waterman, which is one of the major industries for that community, found that they were literally unable to work and they're still unclear as to what's going to happen to their crops. so we have a serious problem. give you just two examples of people who lived through this, the storm, in c ri sfield. mary, who lived in an apartment with cody, her trained medical dog. mary suffered from epileptic seizures and cody serves as her lifeline when these seizures occur. mary has no family in the area. she cannot work due to her disability. her own source of income is a small social security check. well, when hurricane sandy hit crisfield, the water rose rapidly in her apartment, mary was forced to grab cody and nothing else and to jump out of the window and swim to safety. she lost all of her belongings, including all of her records, which might be helpful for her to be able to try
city of kansas in my home state. officer jeff athalate fatally shot while on duty, investigating drug activity occurring inside a vehicle outside a neighborhood grocery store. as they approached the vehicle and orbded the okay -- ordered the occupants to get out the gunmen took the lives of both officers. when we lose someone in a community in kansas, it's not just a name. it's somebody we go to church with. it's somebody we know and care about. these individuals are that to their friends and family in topeka and across our state. david had been part of the topeka police department for 21 years. he spent 13 years as a reserve officer and 8 years as a full-time officer. his service tkphot begin as a police officer. he served in the kansas national guard and recently retired. police chief ronald miller described david as someone who served his life to his country and to the city of tow pea kafplt david's service was a model to others including his son brandon who followed his dad's footsteps and served the topeka community as a police officer himself. the second officer -- jeff -- was 2
responsibility for what happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapable. citizens held the mayor's office accountable for the prosaic tasks of daily life, like trash collection, fixing potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executing strategies for the economic and social advancement of the city. in legislative life, by contrast, we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, cosponsorships, interviews and other means. it takes courage to declare dozens or even hundreds of positions and stand for office knowing that with each position, you are displeasing some group of voters. but we do our country a disservice if we mistake the act of taking positions for governance. they are not the same thing. governance requires adaptation to shifting circumstances. it often requires finding common ground with americans who have a different vision than your own. it requires leaders who believe, like edmond burke, that their first responsibility to their constituents is to apply their best judgment. it is possible to be elected and reelected again and again and gain prominence i
in my city was fficehat happened in my city was comprehensive and inescapablee citizens have the mayors of thic accountable. trash collection, fixing stree potholes in the streets, snow removal, but also for executingc strategies, economic and sociali advancement of the city's. w in legislative life, by contrast , we are responsible for positions expressed through votes, co-sponsor shipped in interviewsit, and other means. declared dozens or even hundreds of positions, stand for office d knowing that with the position ou are displacing some group of voters. t we do our country a disservice if we this -- mistake the active taking positions for government. they're not the same thing. ite government requires. adaptation through said -- shifting circumstances.n it also requires finding common ground with americans to have ar different vision than your own. it requires leaders you believet like edmundo burke, that their s first responsibility to their ay constituents is to apply their best judgment. a a is possible to be elected ann reelected again and again and gained prominence in the sena
female members and friends, and all who surround us in our daily tasks. this is no lasting city, we know. may we pass through it with a little more gratitude and with a firmer determination to live the kind of lives we've been called to live. mr. president, i yield the floor. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the leadership time is reserved. and under the previous order, the senate will be in a period of morning business until 3:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. mr. mcconnell: i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new jersey. mr. menendez: i ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. menendez: mr. president, i rise with a heavy heart at the senseless tragedy in newtown, connecticut, that took place this friday. we're all shaken up from that day, and we ask ourselves why. how could this happen in america? we grope for answers, and i hope we'll
has made a request. yes, is it a hefty $60 billion? but look at who was hit -- a big city that's the heart -- one of the heartbeats of america: new york. and a little community like crisfield. now matter h.j. you live in -- but no matter whether you live in new york city or in crisfield, maryland, you deserve the help of your government. and i say to my colleagues, let's think of the people we were sent here to represent. we weren't sent here to represent a bottom line. we were here to represent people. and i would hope that we would put into place -- that we would pass the president's request. we have great policies that were arrived at. and if you really want to honor senator inouye, let's honor the way his own code of conduct -- a gentle way, a civil way, a consensus builder, a bipartisan builder, and a worker to move this bill. senator inouye chaired the full committee on aeption pros these -- on appropriations these last couple of years. his own staff shared a story with me. and it is relative with me here. he said, i chair the defense committee -- subcommittee,ances and t
a tremendous amount of damage. terror attacks such as 9/11, oklahoma city, in this case hurricanes -- and we've had a number of those. katrina stands in our minds, but irene and on and on it goes -- sandy being the latest. and this one was truly of monumental proportion and create add lot of damage. and, therefore, a federal response is needed and necessary, if we're going to begin to have an adequate recovery, get people back too work and back in their homes, businesses up and growing again and working. and the bill that is currently on the floor for us here attem attempts to do that. now, some of us were somewhat staggered by the initial number, $60.4 billion. that may not be enough. that may be too much. but in the short amount of time that we've had to try to put all the estimates together in terms of what might be needed, what we have -- senate republican appropriations members attempted to do is separate that from what is immediately needed -- immediate laid being from the time of the storm through march 27 -- to attend to those first responders, those initial responses that need to ta
of supervisors of the mayor or the city attorney are somebody and see what his job was like. and what a good thing that was. i remember that. and one of the reasons, architecture that i was in china, but one of the things i thought was great in architecture is in australia, they have changed now, but they built a parliament. and this parliament, whatever architecture reason, it goes up like this. it's huge, and the building goes down almost to the ground and it's covered with grass, the whole ceiling. so what the children, would come in droves in the buses and they would go to the top and they would go down like that. and i thought what a good idea. the association in their mind will be this democratic government of australia, and it has a place where i can go and roll downhill, so they'll have a positive association and it will make you more interested and they will learn about it. so i'm just pointing out there is no single technique, but ultimately it does depend on building the support for this idea. which means explain, which debating, which means discussing, which means the press event
. what has this city never been able to get the arms around the level of fraud and abuse. what does it say for the expansion of government-one programs? >> well, the fact is that it's expensive to weed out the waste fraud and abuse. it takes an awful lot of government time and money put in to eliminating it. i think it's worth doing it. i don't think we do it nearly enough because if you stop it, and slow it down, then gradually you can retract the government requirement to weed it out. you get rid of it you don't have to pay as much to keep it out as you do to get out, in my opinion. it's been something -- government at times is wasteful in what it doesn't do as much as it is in what it does do. it's never rise tonight top level as i think it should, and hope it does. now one of the reasons i didn't want a government - run option as part of the health care bill because that would have been, in my opinion, a dumping ground for a government program to provide insurance and move away from the private market. i believe in private market for insurance. there's some cases where people ar
this through a number of different channels. some of which can best be discussed in other cities. but as you know the fbi is leading the investigation because the department is very actively supporting this. i've been at liberty to talk to the living leadership about the importance of their cooperation and investigation but i could wear making some progress. ambassador pope works everyday on this issue in support of the fbi. i was in tunisia last week to emphasize to the tunisian president and prime minister the importance we attach to cooperation of detaining one of the suspects in the benghazi attack. and i believe where making some progress. so the answer is, to your question is we don't have all the edges yet but we're working those were little sick and i think we're making some progress. >> thank you. with regard to in the mentation of the recommendations of this report, you go through the report, senator corker referred to 18 different accountability review boards over a number of years. a recurring theme seems to be stovepipe decision-making. just earlier today i further bureaucratic
this city was unacceptable to him, and he made that clear to all of us. danny's focus was on people, on the infrastructure that they depend on in their communities, on the most vulnerable, on our military families, and on the state of hawaii. mr. president, if danny inouye was a giant here in the senate, he was a mountain back home. hawaii would not be hawaii without danny inouye. he fought for his state. he would not allow it to be ignored, and he made it a better place to live and work for george bush reagan administrations to come. -- for generations to come. mr. president, as a senator from another state far from washington, d.c., i learned a lot from senator inouye about how to advocate for the people who elect you and how to make sure they never get lost here in the mix. through his quiet and shining example, we all earn willed a bit -- we all learned a bit more about bipartisan. i so remember danny huddling on the floor working closely with his good friend, senator stevens from alaska. we all learned a bit more about effectiveness. he knew how to get things done. we all learn
much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm bill. we do too much of that around here on -- on other areas of public policy. we should do what we've always done in the senate long before i got here, passing five-year bills with regard to the farm bill. it does create economic opportunities in rural areas. it sustains the consumers and businesses that rely upon our rural economy. the senate-passed farm bill would reduce the deficit by approximately $23 billion through the elimination of some subsidies, the consolidation of programs, and -- and producing greater efficiencies in the delivery mechanisms in programs. now, we're having a big debate about the end of the year a
members are from small towns, our big cities and our rural areas. they are our neighbors and they are our fellow americans. and they are my fellow north carolinians. justin marquez, daniel lineberry, just a couple of the heroes who lived among us. we must remember them and honor them now and always. so at this time of the year i want to extend my warmest wishes of the holiday season to our service members, both those serving now and those who have gone before us, and to the families and friends who cannot be with their loved ones. thank you, mr. president. and i ask -- note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from kansas. a senator: mr. president, thank you. i ask unanimous consent to address the senate as if in morning business. the presiding officer: we are in a quorum call. mr. moran: mr. president, i ask the quorum call be lifted. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. moran: mr. president, i ask the senate to address the senate as if in morning business. the pres
big state government. we have lots of little localities. take long beach, a city of 35,000 gone, wiped out, basically. if they had to come up with 35% of the project, it would be hopeless. now, katrina got 100%. we're not even asking for that. but the 90% that has traditionally been given to army corps projects when the damage is so large that it has realized that the locality cannot pay for it alone makes imminent sense. the village of lindenhurst, the village of massapequa, the villages on fire island all do not have the wherewithal. if we were to say and pass the senator from oklahoma's amendment, we get no army corps relief. and then when storms much smaller than sandy came, we would be wiped out again. so it doesn't make sense. the storm beach damage reduction project in long beach, for instance, has a local cost share of $35 million. that's more than a quarter of the entire city's annual budget. if they had to pay their share, it wouldn't get built. same thing, take a little vote -- take a little small village of asheroken which was terribly damaged. again, in the past, when ther
. that comes down to the county level. when that happened in miami-dade, not a republican on city council that is pushing those funds over. that's something they can handle at the county level. i think that's something at least my bipartisan standpoint everyone agrees we need more resources. as far as how me days we go, it's not for me to decide but at least in terms of resourcing i think i can help a lot of these lying issues. >> i would disagree with you on a lot of what you just said, but i do think -- [laughter] >> respectfully. >> look, maybe, it's 2012 in the united states of america. acceptable to the people voting after midnight ever. so whether it's more people would be able to vote or not, even if was the same number of people it's unacceptable. we need to do every single thing we can possibly do to avoid that. everything. that does not mean after you win a gubernatorial election that you cut the number of days, number of hours people can vote, or in ohio's case, to cut the we cannot early vote. to spend millions of dollars, millions of taxpayers dollars to fight to stop the las
with two feet of snow and 60-mile-an-hour winds when a blizzard hammered the city. it caused 36 deaths, stranded 1,500 people on lake shore drive, which i go back and forth on every day and still find it hard to imagine, 1,500 people stuck on lake shore drive. it resulted in $3.9 billion in losses. april was the wettest april in 116 years in the midwest, forcing the mississippi and missouri rivers to flood thousands of square miles. this is 2011 i'm talking about. there were 326 tornadoes in may throughout the midwest and southern u.s., resulting in the deadliest may since 1933. wildfires burned 3 million acres of property across the western states, causing over a billion dollars in damages. and hurricane irene devastated the atlantic coast, causing $4.3 billion in damage. a very small amount compared to sandy but significant still for those affected. nationwide, the financial consequences of weather-related disasters and climate change hit an historic new high last year. u.s. disasters cost over $55 billion in damages. federal, state and local governments are paying out more every yea
i just laid out but, you know, elder -- an elder told me one time in urban cities you walk out the door, you go down the street to safeway for your food. in rural alaska, you open your door, what's in front of you, the nature that they see, is the grocery store. so when they have in our case the y.k. delta in the western part of alaska had devastating king salmon fishery loss in the sense of the qawpt of fish. when that fish is not able to be harvested to be put in the storehouses for the winter, the limited cash that they have in an area where fuel costs to heat their home are $8, $9, $12 a gallon, now have to go to not only heating they've set aside that cash for, now they have to get food shipped in. so their limited cash is now split between heating their home and putting food on the table. in fairbanks, alaska, which is urban, but outside, 40 below yesterday. so heating the home is not just like turning your heater on after work. it's a whole different ballgame. but they live off the land. it is not some hobby on the weekend, not a sports event. it's where they harvest the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17